A Rediscovered Forgotten Species Brews Promise For Coffee's Future

A Rediscovered Forgotten Species Brews Promise For Coffee's Future

Scientists in Sierra Leone's dense tropical forests have rediscovered a coffee species that has not been seen in the wild in decades - a plant that they believe may help secure the future of this valuable commodity, which has been threatened by climate change.

Andrew H. Sweet
Andrew H. Sweet
  • In dense tropical forests in Sierra Leone, scientists have rediscovered a coffee species not seen in the wild in decades - a plant they say may help secure the future of this valuable commodity that has been imperiled by climate change.
  • The researchers said that the species, called Coffea stenophylla, possesses greater tolerance for higher temperatures than the Arabica coffee, which makes up 56% of global production, and the robusta coffee that makes up 43%.
  • The stenophylla coffee was demonstrated to have a superior flavor, similar to Arabica.
  • Many farmers throughout the world's coffee-growing belt are already experiencing climate change's adverse effects, an acute concern for the multibillion-dollar industry.

Read the original story here.

Comments

Sign in or become a tippinsights member to join the conversation.
Just enter your email below to get a log in link.