Aspirin Has Long Been Prescribed To Prevent Heart Attacks. Now Experts Say It Shouldn't.

Aspirin Has Long Been Prescribed To Prevent Heart Attacks. Now Experts Say It Shouldn't.

Andrew H. Sweet

In a draft statement, the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force, an independent group of experts that advise on disease prevention and evidence-based medicine, have updated their recommendations, saying that preemptively taking aspirin is not worth the risks for older adults.

Specifically, the panel states that while starting on aspirin to prevent the onset of heart disease may be beneficial to younger adults (aged 40 to 59) on a case-by-case basis, adults aged 60 and older should not start the regimen.

The panel states that the risks of serious side effects, including bleeding in the stomach, intestines, and brain, aren't worth the potential benefits.

The task force clarifies that its new recommendations only apply to those who have never had a heart attack or stroke before and are not already regularly taking aspirin. But if you are 60 or older and have no history of cardiovascular disease, you should not begin on aspirin.

Read the original story here.

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