Josephine Baker Becomes First Black Woman To Enter France's Panthéon

Josephine Baker Becomes First Black Woman To Enter France's Panthéon

Andrew H. Sweet

She is also the first entertainer to be immortalized alongside writer Victor Hugo, scientist Marie Curie and nearly 80 other figures from the worlds of politics, science, and the arts in a solemn ceremony led by President Emmanuel Macron.

Baker, who left the U.S. in 1925 to escape racial segregation and found fame in France, is buried in Monaco.

When World War II started, she joined the Resistance against Nazi Germany, becoming a lieutenant in the French air force's female auxiliary corps.

She also became a spy for France's wartime leader-in-exile, General Charles de Gaulle, obtaining information on Italian leader Benito Mussolini and sending reports to London hidden in her music sheets in invisible ink.

Read the original story here.

Comments

Sign in or become a tippinsights member to join the conversation.
Just enter your email below to get a log in link.