Not Mere Posturing – North Korea Has The Means To Back Its Bluster

Not Mere Posturing – North Korea Has The Means To Back Its Bluster

A majority of Americans, 68%, consider North Korea to be a threat. The country’s nuclear programs and illicit trade have long been viewed with trepidation by others.

Anjali Krishnan

Despite travel and information connectivity that is a hallmark of the modern world, and the world emerging as a global village, the Democratic People's Republic of Korea (DPRK) remains a secret that has worried the West for the past few decades.

North Korea's Supreme Leader's overtures to find a diplomatic solution to the country's contentious relations with the West had raised some hopes in the political circles in the past few years. But, North Koreas' track record does not bode well for finding easy and swift answers.

The divided Koreas are the fallout of the Second World War, and its continued separate status is the result of the Cold War. The Democratic People's Republic of Korea officially remains at war with its neighbor, South Korea.

The active war status is less of a global concern than the country's continued pursuit of nuclear arms and other weapons of mass destruction, which has kept the dictatorship at the forefront of international news.

Many Americans, well aware of the country's weaponization, consider North Korea a long-term threat.

The TIPP Poll asked: Please indicate whether the country poses an immediate threat to the United States (within the next six months), a long-term threat to the United States (over six months), or does not pose a threat to the United States at all.

Overall, this is how Americans reacted: